Dashes & splashes… some important measurements

This isn’t the most exciting post, but it’s one that’ll prove useful.  A lot of times, a recipe will call for a measurement other than an ounce or 1/4 of an ounce… like a dash or a splash, or an older recipe might even call for a pony, a cocktail glass or a wine glass of an ingredient.  I thought it’d be helpful for myself to have a one-stop source of what all these measurements mean.  So maybe this post’ll be helpful for others as well, but it’ll at least be a nice and easy reference for myself when mixing up a drink.  Here’s a list of all the slightly unusual measurements you might come across when looking for cocktail recipes, along with another very handy recipe to have… simple syrup.

Measurements:

Dash = 6 drops

Teaspoon = 1/8 ounce

Splash = 1/2 ounce

Tablespoon = 1/2 ounce

Pony = 1 ounce

Cordial = 1 ounce

Pousse-cafe glass = 1.5 ounces

Jigger = 1.5 ounces

Shot = 1.5 ounces

Cocktail glass = 2 ounces

Wineglass = 4 ounces

Cup = 8 ounces

Small tumbler = 8 ounces

Large tumbler = 16 ounces

Mixing glass = 16 ounces

Fifth = 750 ml = 25.4 ounces

 

Making simple syrup…

Equal parts sugar & water (1:1 ratio)

Combine the sugar & water in a small sauce pan and bring to a simmer.  Continue simmering, stirring until the sugar dissolves.  This will only take a few minutes.  Remove pan from the heat, and let it sit to cool down to room temperature.  After it’s cooled down, go ahead and transfer it to a container.   You can store the simple syrup in the refrigerator for up to a month.

Pretty simple, right?  Simple syrup’s so easy to make, and you can just make enough for what you’ll most likely need in a month’s time, it’s definitely worth making and having on hand.  You’ll be glad you have it, when you need it.

 

 

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Sherry makes an appearance…

I decided to pick up a bottle of Sherry finally.  I’ve been tempted to buy a bottle of Sherry ever since I tried a “Jabberwock” at the St. Louis bar, Sanctuaria.  The “Jabberwock” was the first drink I had at this bar, and it’s made up of sherry, caperitif, and gin.  It was a fantastic drink.  Like vermouth, sherry is a fortified wine.  Sherry’s fortified with brandy, giving it a slightly caramely taste.  The kind of sherry I bought is a fino sherry, which is a light and dry sherry.  I feel like cocktails with sherry have a very delicate and light character.  I have to say, I’m not totally in love with sherry, but it’s definitely a nice change of pace.

Four of the five drinks listed below were ones I tried using my new bottle of sherry, and the fifth is just a classic cocktail (the Monkey Gland) that I wanted to try.  Three out of the four sherry drinks were quite good, with only one being a dud. *  That’s pretty good odds based upon the fact that there aren’t really that many drink recipes out there calling for sherry.  In addition, it’s really good odds considering the fact that the search for the drink recipes came after my buying the sherry.  Usually, if I find the drink recipe before buying a bottle of something new, the drink’s almost guaranteed to be good.  This is typically the case because the recipe tends to speak for itself.  The combination of ingredients sounds so good that I’m compelled to buy a new ingredient.  On the other hand, when an ingredient has piqued my interest first, and then I have to scrounge up recipes to use it in, often times it’s easier for me to fall short.

So here they are, a few sherry drinks, plus an old classic stand by…

“Seville Cocktail”

This drink was probably my favorite of all the sherry drinks I tried. It was really good and made me question my theory that I don’t care for drinks combining gin & orange juice.  I’m now open to the idea!  This was a really good drink because of all the extra ingredients in addition to the gin/orange combo… the lemon, the sherry and the sugar.  The sherry really adds a nice flavor and some substance.  I often think the gin/orange combo tastes hollow, but the sherry adds a worthy element, and it also cuts through and softens the intensity of the juices.  Very good drink!

1.5 oz. gin

1/2 oz. fino sherry

1/2 oz. orange juice

1/2 oz. lemon juice

2 t simple syrup

Shake well and strain in to a chilled cocktail glass.

“Sevilla”

This was quite an elaborate drink for me to make.  (especially on a weeknight – ha! ha!)  I’ve never used ground cinnamon in a drink before, and I’ve never even tasted hot pepper jelly until this drink.  I found this drink in Dale DeGroff’s “The Essential Cocktail” book, and I have to say, it’s quite an interesting drink.  It’s a spicy drink, a quite spicy drink!  Overall, I like the idea of the drink.  However I would say that the texture of the ground cinnamon was a little off-putting.  It’s got such a dry texture, it kind of made me thirstier each time I’d take a drink.  I actually think it’d be a better drink without the ground cinnamon rim.  Also, I personally liked the spice of the hot pepper jelly, but that too could be removed based on personal preference or your mood at the time.  It’s great if you want a drink with some heat, which is definitely fun, but I think a drink with just the rum, sherry, orange and lime might be quite a good drink.  With the cinnamon and jelly, the drink resembles an actual meal (and that was DeGroff’s point, I think), but without the cinnamon, it’d be more “drink-like”.  Try it, and see for yourself!

1 oz. white rum

1/2 oz. fino sherry

3/4 oz. orange juice

1/4 oz. lime juice

1 t hot pepper jelly

ground cinnamon to rim the glass

1 flamed orange peel for garnish

Shake well and fine strain in to chilled cocktail glass.

(“The Essential Cocktail”)

“Poppy Variation”

This drink was the dud of the group.  It was OK, not terrible, but not great.  It’s like a slightly sweeter dry martini.

1.75 oz. gin

3/4 oz. dry sherry

1 dash orange bitters

1 dash Angostura bitters

Stir well and strain in to a chilled cocktail glass.

“Adonis Cocktail”

This was a very nice cocktail.  It’s silky & light.  It’s sweet, but also a bit deep & dry, with notes of caramel from the sherry.

2 oz. dry sherry

3/4 oz. sweet vermouth

1 dash orange bitters

Stir well and strain in to a chilled cocktail glass.

“Monkey Gland”

My original notes on this drink are pretty funny to read, because I started off not liking the drink much, but as I drank it, I liked it more and more.  I don’t know if that’s the best characteristic for a drink- to be bad at the beginning but good by the end, but who knows… it is what it is.  Here’s my actual notes, written as I drank the cocktail…

               1- I don’t know… the anise and OJ tastes a little medicinal.

               2- It’s OK, not great, not bad.

               3- It’s kind of a nice, fruity absinthe drink, which is a bit unusual.

               4- It’s kind of grown on me.

Ha ha! This drink got the best of me!  Hats off to it for that!

1.5 oz. gin

1 oz. orange juice

1/4 oz. grenadine

1 splash of absinthe

orange peel for garnish

Shake well and strain in to a chilled cocktail glass.

* As I was writing this post, I actually remembered a 5th sherry drink I tried, which was terrible. It was such a dud, that I didn’t even want to write about it, so beware… BEWARE the “Quarter Deck”.  It was terrible!


A random assortment of drinks, tied together by nothing more than time.

This latest post is a random grab-bag of cocktails.  There’s no overarching theme.  There’s no prominent new ingredient used in all of the drinks.  They’re not all from some new book I bought.

These four drinks have nothing in common other than the fact that I’ve made and drank each of them in the last couple of weeks, since my last post.  Each of them comes from its own, unique source as well… the Loop Tonic from a blog I read called “Spirited Cocktails”, the Plantation from one of the first cocktail books I ever bought called “The Art of the Bar”, the Sitarski from the actual first cocktail book I ever bought, Gary Regan’s “The Bartender’s Bible”, and the “Blue Devil” from a book that I picked up at a used book fair called “The New York Bartender’s Guide”.

Loop Tonic

The Loop Tonic has knocked my socks off!  It's a drink I just happened to read about in a blog called "Spirited Cocktails".  When I read about this drink, I was shocked by the idea of putting tequila and green Chartreuse together (I'd never tried that), but looking at all of the ingredients together, I thought it looked really, really good, and had the potential to be amazing.  I was intrigued... especially by the notion of celery bitters.  And that's the only thing I needed to go out and buy to make this drink that seemed so exotic to me.  So that day, I went out and got some celery bitters, and made up this drink.  I'm so glad I did because this drink is super delicious!  I flip, and grin ear-to-ear, when I think about making this drink, because it's so tasty and such an interesting drink!  All of the ingredients meld very nicely together, and the celery bitters add a really nice bite to the drink. If you like Chartreuse and you have 6 bucks to spare, I highly recommend going out and buying the celery bitters to try this drink.  

2 oz. white tequila

1 oz. dry vermouth

3/4 oz. lime juice

1/2 oz. simple syrup

1/2 oz. green Chartreuse

dash of celery bitters

Shake well and strain in to a chilled cocktail glass.

(“Spirited Cocktails” – http://spiritedcocktails.com/index.php/2011/07/29/beautiful-combinations-tequila-chartreuse/ )

The Plantation

This is a really great drink as well.  I found this drink while flipping through the pages of perhaps my favorite cocktail book I own, “The Art of the Bar” by Jeff Hollinger & Rob Schwartz.  I was bored and wanted to try something new, when I stumbled across this drink which called for basil.  Since the basil plant on our back porch had just recently begun to look healthy and good, I figured this’d be a fun one to try.  It was a good call, because this drink is really good!  The fresh taste of the basil, mixed with the lime and gin, make this a really refreshing summer cocktail.  I love basil in general… I love its taste and I love its smell… basil makes me happy.  So this drink, incorporating fresh basil, makes me happy too.

5 fresh basil leaves

1/2 teaspoon sugar

1 oz. gin

1/2 oz. triple sec

1/2 oz. lime juice

1 oz. grapefruit juice

1 basil leaf for a garnish (the original recipe calls for a slice of grapefruit as the garnish)

Muddle the basil and sugar in the bottom of your cocktail shaker until it’s like a paste, then add the rest of the ingredients and ice.

Shake well and then strain, using a fine-mesh sieve, in to a chilled cocktail glass.

(“The Art of the Bar”)

Sitarski

Again, an evening where I was a little bored of my standing drink menu, I started flipping through the pages of the very first cocktail book I ever bought, Gary Regan’s “The Bartender’s Bible”.  I wanted to make a drink using dark rum in order to try the Jamaican rum my wife and I had won a couple of months ago, while on vacation, playing “Name That Tune” on a stormy day at our resort in Montego Bay.   This bottle of rum holds a special place in my heart for two reasons… 1- It reminds me of one of the most fun vacations I’ve ever been on, and 2- It reminds me of the victorious, proud feeling I had when my wife and I schooled a bunch of youngsters by knowing more music from the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s than they did.  I always love when music comes up in trivia games, as it lights the biggest competitive fire in my belly.  But I digress, that’s neither here nor there.  I wanted to try the rum, and so I picked out this drink, the Sitarski.  This drink’s pretty good when you’re looking for big ole drink with rum that’s easy to kick back and enjoy.

1.5 oz. dark rum

2 oz. grapefruit juice

1/2 oz. lime juice

1 teaspoon lemon juice

1 teaspoon simple syrup

Shake well and strain in to an old-fashioned glass filled with ice cubes.

(“The Bartender’s Bible”)

The Blue Devil

This last drink was purely made because I wanted to try a bottle of blue curacao that I’d just bought.  So I flipped to another cocktail book’s index and looked under “B” for blue.   Sure enough, there were 12 drinks with “blue” in the name, and 9 of them contained blue curacao.  This drink’s nothing special, but if you really need a blue drink, it’s good enough.

2 oz. gin

1/2 oz. lime juice

1 tablespoon maraschino liqueur

1 teaspoon blue curacao

Shake well and strain in to a chilled cocktail glass.

(“The New York Bartender’s Guide”)