A Cocktail of Cocktails (?)

On 10/26/14, the world lost a young baseball superstar of great promise, Oscar Taveras. Baseball fans learned of this tragic loss during the 2014 World Series, when it was announced over the air.

Shocked and in disbelief from this unexpected, terribly sad news, I needed a drink to sit back, take in the news and reflect on young Oscar and his saddened families (both his real family as well as his Cardinals family). Too saddened and shook to worry about mixing up a drink from ground zero, I just took the little bit of pre-mixed Manhattan I had already on hand and added cognac to it to make it a better-sized drink. Although the “technique” was unorthodox, the result was certainly tasty. Which begs the question…

Although the excuse for this concoction of mine was due to my lack of motivation to mix a drink from scratch, has anyone ever seen this technique in use before? Perhaps not just a Manhattan plus the addition of one other spirit (like mine was), but maybe two or three complete cocktails put together – A cocktail made of a combo of other cocktails? A “cocktail of cocktails”, so to speak.

I’d be interested to know.

Either way, at the end of the day, we’ll miss Oscar Taveras, and I hold his family and friends and his memory in my heart. This sad excuse for a drink is dedicated to the memory of Oscar Taveras, a tragic loss for St. Louis and the game of baseball…

1 part Manhattan
1 part cognac

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Cocktail hour across Missouri

Cocktail hour across Missouri, with a “Show Me Cocktail”, a Scientist McGee original drink created as an homage to the 2014 Major League Baseball postseason featuring the St. Louis Cardinals and the Kansas City Royals. A good time for baseball in Missouri, the “Show Me State”.

3/4oz rye whiskey
3/4oz apple brandy
3/4oz Swedish Punsch
1/4oz pear liqueur
2d Boker’s @adamsbitters

Stir with ice and serve up.

This drink’s split base spirit was directly influenced by the drinks of Death & Co. in New York City, as I was immersed at that time in their wonderful new book.

Furthermore, to truly pay homage to Missouri, I recommend mixing this drink with some rye whiskey that is distilled and bottled within the borders of our state, or better yet still, within the confines of one of these two fine cities – St. Louis or Kansas City.

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The Off-Season


It’s been nearly a month since my last post, and I don’t have a lot to show for it.  I wondered today why that was.  And it’s pretty much because our hometown baseball team, the St. Louis Cardinals, have been in post-season play… October baseball.  As you may have heard, the Redbirds won the World Series.  In St. Louis, virtually all of every day life slows down a bit and takes a back seat to post-season baseball when the Cardinals are playing in it.  Restaurants that aren’t pizza joints or bar and grills take a hit because people aren’t going out and spending time enjoying nice dinners.  Evening meetings and classes either get cancelled or they get cut very short, by speeding up the agenda.  Weekend chores get delayed to free up afternoons in front of the TV.  And me taking the time to look through books for new cocktail recipes and spending the time in the kitchen preparing them and taking a photo of them takes a backseat as well.

St. Louis is historically a beer town, and the Cardinals are one of the only things that trumps beer around here.  So as the days went on and games continued, my beer drinking did the same.  So if I wasn’t cracking open a beer, I certainly wasn’t spending the time necessary to find new cocktails to try.  I was instead mixing up the quick and easy standards that I’d made many times before.

So now that October baseball is finished, we all find ourselves with a lot more time on our hands.  We have our evenings and weekends free again, so to speak.  There’s no more rushed, quick 2-minute commercial breaks while watching the game.  I once again have the time to peruse cocktail books while relaxing in the evening.  I have time to pause the TV and mix up a special drink.  I have time to sit down and post these drinks on to the Scientist McGee blog.

“Jewel Cocktail”

I found this drink in “The Savoy Cocktail Book”, and under its entry, Harry Craddock added a note that said, “A medium-dry, fast working cocktail.”  “Fast working cocktail” can be used to describe any drink that calls for the 110-proof Chartreuse, and this is a great drink for lovers of the liqueur. The Chartreuse definitely takes center stage, while just being “watered down” by the gin and vermouth.  If you love Chartreuse, as I do, you’ll like this drink.  The Chartreuse is balanced nicely with the flavors of the orange bitters and lemon peel, with the gin and vermouth rounding it out with some extra body.

1/3 green Chartreuse

1/3 gin

1/3 dry vermouth

dash of orange bitters

garnish with a lemon peel and a cherry

Stir well with ice and strain in to a chilled cocktail glass.

(“The Savoy Cocktail Book”)

“Bobby Burns”

The Bobby Burns is a classic cocktail that can also be found in the Savoy Cocktail Book, but I took this recipe from Dale DeGroff’s “Essential Cocktail”.  To be honest, it’s not one of my favorite drinks, but then again, scotch isn’t really one of my favorite spirits.  But some times I am in the specific mood for the smoky flavor of scotch, and when I am, this drink is a good one.  With the scotch and the Benedictine, it almost coats your mouth like a syrup with a smoky, buttery flavor.

2 oz. scotch

3/4 oz. sweet vermouth

1/2 oz. Benedictine

Stir well with ice and strain in to a chilled cocktail glass.

(“Essential Cocktail”)

“Can-Can Martini”

 

I got this drink from the St. Germain company, and it’s a great way to enjoy the elderflower liqueur.  It’s nice & sweet, but dry… like a floral martini.  It’s a nice, simple cocktail.  It’s good when you want a straight forward gin drink that goes down easily, with the sweet, delicate taste of St. Germain.

2 oz. gin

1 oz. St. Germain

1/4 oz. dry vermouth

lemon peel for garnish

Stir well with ice and strain in to a chilled cocktail glass.